Immigration Newsletter

Friday, November 15, 2013

Top Republican Says House Will Act On Immigration Reform Before 2014 Election

Top Republican Says House Will Act On Immigration Reform Before 2014 Election

WASHINGTON -- Rep. Greg Walden (R-Ore.), the lawmaker tasked with electing Republicans to the House, said Friday his chamber will act on immigration reform before the 2014 midterm elections.
Keeping in line with GOP leadership, the chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee said the House will pursue a piecemeal approach, but it will not go to conference on the Senate's comprehensive bill or take up similar legislation introduced by House Democrats.
"Between now and the election I think the House will take up immigration in a piece-by-piece approach," Walden told reporters at a breakfast sponsored by the Christian Science Monitor.

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Click the link to see more on HuffPo by 
Once the 2014 Tea Primaries are over, the establishment GOP can get on with the business of appeasing business -- and that means passing immigration reform. 

Thursday, November 14, 2013

Tina Turner formally ‘relinquishes’ U.S. citizenship

Tina Turner formally ‘relinquishes’ U.S. citizenship

Well that's kind of a shame. It is interesting to note that it does take some work to relinquish US citizenship. I'm sure she still loves the United States - but then again, "What's love got to do with it?"

Monday, November 11, 2013

Immigration Vote Unlikely This Year, Lawmaker Says - NYTimes.com

Immigration Vote Unlikely This Year, Lawmaker Says - NYTimes.com
reported by Julia Preston : click the link to see the article in full
A top Republican lawmaker told protesters he met with in his home district in California this week that the House of Representatives would not have time this year to vote on any immigration measure.
Representative Kevin McCarthy, the majority whip, told demonstrators in his office in Bakersfield on Wednesday night that the 16 days remaining on the House calendar in 2013 were too short a window for the House to take up the complex issue. But he said he was committed to moving on immigration votes in the House next year. 
The comments were reported by Angelica Salas, the executive director of the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles, who was one of the protesters who occupied Mr. McCarthy’s office for 10 hours on Wednesday. 

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So, the GOP wants to pass Comprehensive Immigration Reform in an election year. Interesting. It would appear that the current incumbents would like to wait until the last possible moment to spring this so as to avoid giving negative ad bait to any possibly more rabid restrictionist primary opponents. Then run on how immigrant friendly they are in a general election. Well, if it will get the votes needed - then go for it! That's what I think anyway.

Monday, November 4, 2013

Felony deportations decline as ICE officers resist former chief's 2010 directive | The Chicago Reporter

Felony deportations decline as ICE officers resist former chief's 2010 directive | The Chicago Reporter

here is an excerpt from the article linked above ....

Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia, an immigration law professor at Penn State Law School, said this data potentially raise serious concerns about whether the agency is channeling its limited resources into its highest enforcement priorities.
Wadhia, who has extensively researched the agency’s use of prosecutorial discretion, said if the agency doesn’t follow its own policy that could affect public trust in the government.
But the mistrust is also happening within the enforcement agency.
Some immigration officials have balked at some of Morton’s directives and refused to follow them. A group of immigration enforcement agents sued Morton and the Department of Homeland Security after the Obama administration announced its deferred action directive. The officers said that if they complied with the policy they would be violating federal immigration law and their oath to uphold federal law. A federal judge dismissed the lawsuit last month.
“The culture is difficult to change from the top down,” Chan said. “And because of the lack of accountability, the community is very skeptical.”
Matthew Kovac helped research this article.






I don't doubt that this is the case. I suspect there are many in the trenches who virulently disagree with exercising any discretion for any reason. It is as difficult for me to understand them as is it for others to understand why I do what I do. Until someone you know is involved in deportations -- it is all just policy talk. 

When you see it in person it is different. It varies in each case -- but many times, deportation means the end of someone's life as they have known it. It can be really hard and very cruel.

In order to do the job as an ICE enforcement agent effectively -- you have to be able to set all of that aside and then be able to not feel sympathy. Otherwise -- the job would eat you up inside. I'm sure for some they had to leave the field for that sort of reason. But trying to translate top down "prosecutorial discretion" to people in ICE enforcement has got to be a difficult proposition.

Thursday, October 24, 2013

Obama Urges House Republicans to Act on Immigration - NYTimes.com

Obama Urges House Republicans to Act on Immigration - NYTimes.com


WASHINGTON — President Obama on Thursday renewed his call for an immigration overhaul, telling an audience of activists at the White House that the fate of a bipartisan Senate bill now rests with Republicans in the House.
“Anyone still standing in the way of this bipartisan reform should at least explain why,” Mr. Obama said to repeated applause in the East Room. “If House Republicans have new and different additional ideas for how we should move forward, then we should hear them. I will be listening.”
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to see the rest of the article at NYTimes.com click the link above.

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Homepage | USCIS

Homepage | USCIS

USCIS.gov is moving to a new page format. Click the link to see what it will look like.

Wednesday, October 2, 2013

The Madness of U.S. Immigration Policy, Continued - Bloomberg

The Madness of U.S. Immigration Policy, Continued - Bloomberg
Here is an excerpt from an Editorial from Bloomberg (click the link to see the rest of the story)

Imagine if Congress mandated that an arbitrary number of jail cells be filled with prisoners -- regardless of the crime rate. Authorities would be required to incarcerate people, no matter the circumstances or the affront to human rights. That’s basically the state of immigration detention in the U.S.


Thanks to a line in the appropriations bill that finances the Department of Homeland Security, 34,000 beds must be available in immigration detention facilities regardless of the flow of illegal immigrants into the U.S. or the rate, or nature, of crimes they commit. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency interprets the mandate as a requirement to keep “a yearly average daily population of approximately 34,000 individuals,” former ICE Director John Morton told a congressional panel in March.
As the number of beds has increased -- from 19,702 in 2001 to 34,000 in 2012 -- the number of noncitizens detained has kept pace, at a cost of approximately $120 a day for each prisoner. This is what happens when public policy is written in reverse, mandating outcomes without regard to inputs.
Some detained noncitizens are violent criminals who need to be locked up. Others are mothers or fathers who have committed traffic violations. Their forced separation from families and jobs undermines both social cohesion and the economy -- at taxpayer expense.
Undocumented immigrants tracked in alternative (nondetention) programs appeared for administrative hearings more than 90 percent of the time, according to Julie Myers Wood, a former assistant secretary of Homeland Security in the George W. Bush administration. They complied with final orders 84 percent of the time. Yet ICE detains more than 400,000 immigrants in more than 250 jails and other facilities at an annual cost of $2 billion.
Why?
Partly because punitive actions against undocumented immigrants are popular in some congressional districts and partly because a more rational approach would disrupt cherished revenue streams. Private-prison lobbies have pushed to keep lucrative detention centers open. And local officials have “treated the increase in bed mandates as a source of revenue for counties and a job creator for their region,” according to a 2013 National Immigration Forum report.
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My comment:
This is what we call corporate welfare folks -- done at the expense of those who do not have much of a voice in US public policy (although perhaps that is changing). The idea of locking people up in jails without any real regard for whether or not they are dangerous or a flight risk, should cause American citizens shame. It is both "make work" big government spending and tax payer subsidy of for-profit business at the same time. It should be enough to make a Tea Party supporter's head explode -- but guess where it is most popular? I wonder what helps rationalize that cognitive dissonance? I let you the reader reach your own conclusion.

Friday, September 6, 2013

USCIS Implements Customer Identity Verification at Field Offices

USCIS Implements Customer Identity Verification at Field Offices Beginning September 9, 2013, USCIS will employ a new verification tool called Customer Identity Verification (CIV) in its field offices. Customers will now submit biometric data, specifically fingerprints and photographs, when appearing at USCIS offices for interviews or to receive evidence of an immigration benefit. CIV will enhance the integrity of the immigration system and combat identity fraud by allowing USCIS to biometrically verify a customer’s identity. Having resolved a technical issue that delayed our original launch, the tool will now be phased-in between September 9 and October 21, 2013 to customers attending an interview or being issued evidence of an immigration benefit. How It Works After a customer arrives at a field office, clears security, and is called to the counter, we will electronically scan two fingerprints and take a picture to verify their identity. The process takes just a few minutes and applies only to customers who have an interview or receive evidence of an immigration benefit. People who come to our office for InfoPass appointments or to accompany a customer will not undergo this process. After we verify the customer’s identity, they can proceed to their interview or receive their document. Currently, USCIS requires applicants and petitioners requesting immigration or naturalization benefits to visit one of our Application Support Centers (ASCs) to provide biometric data. USCIS uses this data to help determine eligibility for requested benefits. This requirement, along with providing a government-issued document for examination, will not change. How It Helps CIV connects instantly to the United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology’s (US-VISIT’s) Secondary Inspections Tool (SIT). SIT is a Web-based application that processes, displays and retrieves biometric and biographic data. US-VISIT also links databases associated with border inspections and security. More Information To learn more about USCIS and its programs, visit www.uscis.gov.

Friday, August 23, 2013

USCIS Working to Correct CPR Cards Issued with Incorrect Expiration Dates - Drew Law Office, pllc.

USCIS Working to Correct CPR Cards Issued with Incorrect Expiration Dates - Drew Law Office, pllc.

USCIS Working to Correct CPR Cards Issued with Incorrect Expiration Dates

Cite as "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13082340 (posted Aug. 23, 2013)" 
USCIS recently alerted AILA that approximately 2,300 conditional permanent residence cards were issued with incorrect expiration dates. USCIS is attempting to rectify this by contacting affected individuals via e-mailto provide them with instructions on obtaining a replacement card. USCIS provided the following details regarding this situation:
  • Between July 22 and August 8, 2013, USCIS issued approximately 2,300 new conditional permanent resident cards with an incorrect expiration date. Instead of a two year validity period, those cards were issued with a ten-year validity period.
  • All recipients of these cards are legitimately approved conditional permanent residents; no individual received a green card in error.
  • USCIS has identified each and every conditional permanent resident who received a green card with an incorrect expiration date and has informed those individuals that they must exchange their current card for one with the correct expiration date.
  • Individuals who will need to exchange their green card do not need to file any form or pay any fee.
  • USCIS has contacted all affected individuals and provided them with options to exchange their green cards, either by mail, which is the fastest option, or in-person at a local USCIS office.
If your client received a conditional permanent residence card with a 10-year expiration date and also received an e-mail from USCIS (fromreplacecard@uscis.dhs.gov) with details on exchanging their green card, this e-mail is not a scam.
*** I do not know of any Drew Law Office, PLLC clients who would fall under this category (Conditional Residents [married less than two years] who received a ten year card instead of a two year card). If you think this might be you -- feel free to contact us. Missing the date for filing a Petition to Remove Conditions on Status is a big problem! ***

Voto Latino to March on Washington | Latina

Voto Latino to March on Washington | Latina

Voto Latino will join civil rights leaders on Saturday, August 24 at the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington to call for leaders to expand Latinos' access to the polls and a path to citizenship for aspiring Americans.
Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino, will address a crowd of thousands at the Lincoln Memorial.
“I am honored to join the Rev. Al SharptonMartin Luther King, IIITom JoynerJanet MurguiaBen Jealous and so many others, to not only commemorate a landmark event that happened 50 years ago, but to also give voice to the opportunities our nation can build on if it were to only tap the full potential of American Latinos,” said Kumar in a release.


Read more: http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/politics/voto-latino-march-washington#ixzz2coEGZi3c 
Follow us: @latina on Twitter | latinamagazine on Facebook

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

USCIS - DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

USCIS - DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

Released Jun 17, 2013
WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano has re-designated Syria for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and extended the existing TPS designation for the country from Oct. 1, 2013, through March 31, 2015. This allows eligible nationals of Syria to register or re-register for TPS in accordance with a notice published today in the Federal Register. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages eligible individuals to register or re-register as soon as possible.


Who’s EligibleCurrent TPS StatusWhen to File
Syrian nationals (and individuals without nationality who last habitually resided in Syria)Have TPSMust re-register during a 60-day re-registration period that runs from June 17, 2013 through Aug. 16, 2013.
Have a Pending TPS Application with USCISYou do not need to file a re-registration application during this extension. USCIS will continue to process your pending application.
Do Not Have TPSMay apply for TPS during a 180-day registration period that runs from June 17, 2013 through Dec. 16, 2013.

A Syrian national, or an individual having no nationality who last habitually resided in Syria, may be eligible for TPS under the re-designation if he or she has continuously resided in the United States since June 17, 2013 and has been continuously physically present in the United States since Oct. 1, 2013. In addition to the continuous residence date requirement, applicants must meet all other TPS eligibility and filing requirements.
During the past year, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of State (DOS) reviewed the conditions in Syria. Based upon this review, Secretary Napolitano has determined that a re-designation and 18-month extension of TPS for Syria is warranted. The extension of the current Syria TPS designation and re-designation is due to the continued disruption of living conditions in the country that are a result of the extraordinary and temporary conditions that led to the initial TPS designation of Syria in 2012. The extension is based on ongoing armed conflict in that region and the continued deterioration of country conditions.
DHS anticipates that there are approximately 2,600 individuals who will be eligible to re-register for TPS under the existing designation of Syria and estimates that approximately 9,000 additional individuals might be eligible to apply for TPS under the re-designation.
Individuals applying for TPS for the first time must submit:
  • Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status;
  • The Form I-821 application fee;
  • Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, regardless of whether they want an Employment Authorization Document (EAD);
  • The biometrics services fee if they are age 14 or older; and
  • The Form I-765 application fee, but only if they want an EAD and are 14 to 65 years old. Those under age 14 or age 66 and older do not need to pay the Form I-765 fee with their initial TPS application.
Individuals re-registering for TPS must submit:
Individuals who still have a pending initial TPS application under Syria do not need to submit a new Form I-821. However, if these individuals want a new EAD, they should submit:
Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. Failure to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee-waiver request will result in the rejection of the TPS application.
All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download TPS forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.
Additional information on TPS for Syria—including guidance on eligibility, the application process, and where to file—is available online at www.uscis.gov/tps. Further details on this extension and re-designation of Syria for TPS, including application requirements and procedures, are available in theFederal Register notice published today.

Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).
For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Facebook (USCIS), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Deferred Action Immigration Program In First Year Aids More Than 400,000

Deferred Action Immigration Program In First Year Aids More Than 400,000

Click on the link to see the rest of the story from Elise Foley at The Huffington Post

WASHINGTON -- One year ago on Thursday, undocumented young peopleturned out by the thousands across the country to apply for a new government program that allows them to stay in the U.S., work and remain safe, for now, from deportation.
A report released Wednesday by the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program provides new information on the so-called Dreamers who applied for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals relief beginning on Aug. 15, 2012.
There are more than 557,000 of them, and nearly 72 percent -- 400,562 -- had been approved for the program as of the end of June. Those Dreamers came to the U.S. as children from around the world, although a majority were born in Mexico, according to the report authored by Brookings senior fellow Audrey Singer and analyst Nicole Prchal Svajlenka. Nearly three-quarters of those Dreamers had been in the country for more than a decade by the time they applied for deferred action, and one-third entered before they were 5 years old. Most applicants were ages 15 to 23, with only about one-quarter of them older than 24, the Brookings report found.

Drew Law Office, PLLC

Thursday, August 8, 2013

ACLU - Know Your Rights

ACLU Know Your Rights pamphlet

I have downloaded and read this pamphlet myself. Good information to know. It is not always easy to stand up for your rights. Still, these are good things to know and remember.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

First on CNN: Iowa’s Steve King heading to South Carolina – CNN Political Ticker - CNN.com Blogs

First on CNN: Iowa’s Steve King heading to South Carolina – CNN Political Ticker - CNN.com Blogs

Click the link above for the rest of the story -- here is all I could stand to reprint.

... If King is curious about seeking the Republican nomination in 2016, as his visit to South Carolina suggests, he would certainly face difficult odds, since no sitting member of the House has been elected president since James Garfield in 1880.
King, though, would have a national platform to discuss his policy ideas and might appeal to elements of the Republican base that remain firmly opposed to the immigration reform bill – "amnesty," in his words - that recently passed the Senate.
He would also add a wrinkle to the Iowa caucuses, given that he represents a conservative and heavily evangelical district in northwest Iowa that figures prominently in the leadoff nominating contest.

Tuesday, July 30, 2013

Tom Tancredo: 'Steve King Is Right' About Drug-Smuggling Dreamers

Tom Tancredo: 'Steve King Is Right' About Drug-Smuggling Dreamers

"...There are in fact far more drug smugglers (and other criminals) than future valedictorians among the nearly 2 million youthful illegal aliens who would qualify for the 'Dream' amnesty." Tom Tancredo

Nice minority outreach for the GOP there guys!

Tuesday, July 16, 2013

Pass the Bill! - NYTimes.com

Pass the Bill! - NYTimes.com

from David Brooks NYT opinion piece click the link above to go to the full OP/ED

"Before Asians, Hispanics and all the other groups can be won with economic plans, they need to feel respected and understood by the G.O.P. They need to feel that Republicans respect their ethnic and cultural identity. If Republicans reject immigration reform, that will be a giant sign of disrespect, and nothing else Republicans say will even be heard.
Whether this bill passes or not, this country is heading toward a multiethnic future. Republicans can either shape that future in a conservative direction or, as I’ve tried to argue, they can become the receding roar of a white America that is never coming back.
That’s what’s at stake."

Tuesday, July 2, 2013

NH Immigration Lawyer Blog: Implementation of the Supreme Court Ruling on the ...

NH Immigration Lawyer Blog: Implementation of the Supreme Court Ruling on the ...: Implementation of the Supreme Court Ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act | Homeland Security fromDHS.gov Statement from Secretary of H...

Thursday, June 27, 2013

Statement by Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano on the Supreme Court Ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act | Homeland Security

Statement by Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano on the Supreme Court Ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act | Homeland Security

For Immediate Release
DHS Press Office
Contact: 202-282-8010
“I applaud today’s Supreme Court decision in United States v. Windsor holding that the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) is unconstitutional. This discriminatory law denied thousands of legally married same-sex couples many important federal benefits, including immigration benefits.  I am pleased the Court agreed with the Administration’s position that DOMA’s restrictions violate the Constitution. Working with our federal partners, including the Department of Justice, we will implement today's decision so that all married couples will be treated equally and fairly in the administration of our immigration laws."

Monday, June 17, 2013

USCIS - DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

USCIS - DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano has re-designated Syria for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and extended the existing TPS designation for the country from Oct. 1, 2013, through March 31, 2015. This allows eligible nationals of Syria to register or re-register for TPS in accordance with a notice published today in the Federal Register. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages eligible individuals to register or re-register as soon as possible.

   

       Who is Eligible          Current TPS Status                  When to File

                     
Syrian nationals (and individuals  without nationality who last habitually resided in Syria)Have TPSMust re-register during a 60-day re-registration   period that runs from June 17, 2013 through Aug. 16, 2013.
Have a Pending TPS Application with USCISYou do not need to file a re-registration application during this extension. USCIS will continue to process your pending application.
Do Not Have TPSMay apply for TPS during a 180-day registration period that runs from June 17, 2013 through Dec. 16, 2013.

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

NH Immigration Lawyer Blog: USCIS - Temporary Protected Status Extended for Sa...

NH Immigration Lawyer Blog: USCIS - Temporary Protected Status Extended for Sa...: USCIS - Temporary Protected Status Extended for Salvadorans Temporary Protected Status Extended for Salvadorans Released May 30, 2013 WASH...

Thursday, May 23, 2013

USCIS Immigrant Fee Payment Moves to USCIS ELIS

USCIS Immigrant Fee Payment Moves to USCIS ELIS

USCIS Immigrant Fee Payment Moves to USCIS ELIS


USCIS has moved the online payment of the USCIS Immigrant Fee to its Electronic Immigration System (USCIS ELIS). Customers must now pay the $165 USCIS Immigrant Fee using USCIS ELIS after they receive their immigrant visa package from the Department of State and before they depart for the United States. USCIS ELIS is easy to use and provides direct access to case status updates. New immigrants will also use USCIS ELIS to file future applications and petitions when they become available in the system.

This fee has been in place since Feb. 1, 2013. Immigrants who receive their visas at U.S. Embassies and Consulates abroad must pay the fee online. The fee allows USCIS to recover the cost of processing the immigrant visa package and other information as well as producing and delivering the permanent resident card after immigrant visa holders are admitted to the United States. Immigrants will soon be directed to the USCIS ELIS website to create an online account and pay the immigrant fee.

The fee does not apply to certain special immigrants and those entering the United States through the inter-country adoption programs.

The USCIS Immigrant Fee is a separate fee from the Department of State immigrant visa application.

Thursday, May 2, 2013

USCIS - Temporary Protected Status Extended for Nicaraguans

USCIS - Temporary Protected Status Extended for Nicaraguans

Temporary Protected Status Extended for Nicaraguans

Released Apr. 3, 2013
WASHINGTON— Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Nicaragua for an additional 18 months, beginning July 6, 2013, and ending Jan. 5, 2015.
Current Nicaraguan beneficiaries seeking to extend their TPS status must re-register during the 60-day re-registration period that runs from April 3, 2013, through June 3, 2013. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to register as soon as possible once the 60-day re-registration period begins. Applications will not be accepted before April 3, 2013.
The 18-month extension also allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new employment authorization document (EAD). Eligible Nicaraguan TPS beneficiaries who request an EAD and meet the re-registration deadline will receive a new EAD with an expiration date of Jan. 5, 2015. USCIS recognizes that some re-registrants may not receive their new EADs until after their current EADs expire. Therefore, USCIS is automatically extending current TPS Nicaragua EADs that have a July 5, 2013, expiration date for an additional six months. These existing EADs are now valid through Jan. 5, 2014.
To re-register, current TPS beneficiaries must submit Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status. TPS re-registrants must also submit Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, but no application fee is required if the re-registrant does not want an EAD.  Re-registrants do not need to pay the Form I-821 application fee, but they must submit the biometric services fee, or a fee waiver request, if they are 14 years or older. All TPS re-registrants applying for an EAD must also submit the Form I-765 application fee, or a fee waiver request.
TPS applicants may request that USCIS waive any fees by filing a Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a personal letter requesting these fees be waived. Failure to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee waiver request will result in rejection of the entire TPS application.
Applicants can download TPS forms for free from the USCIS website at http://www.uscis.gov/forms. Applicants can also request free TPS forms by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.
Additional information on TPS for Nicaragua, including guidance on the application process and eligibility, is available online at http://www.uscis.gov/tps. Further details on this extension of TPS for Nicaragua, including the application requirements and procedures, will appear in a Federal Register notice scheduled for publication on April 3, 2013.
Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online, or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).
For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

USCIS - Temporary Protected Status Extended for Hondurans

USCIS - Temporary Protected Status Extended for Hondurans

Temporary Protected Status Extended for Hondurans

Released Apr 3, 2013
WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Honduras for an additional 18 months, beginning July 6, 2013, and ending Jan. 5, 2015.
Current Honduran beneficiaries seeking to extend their TPS status must re-register during the 60-day re-registration period that runs from April 3, 2013, through June 3, 2013. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages beneficiaries to register as soon as possible once the 60-day re-registration period begins. Applications will not be accepted before April 3, 2013.
The 18-month extension also allows TPS re-registrants to apply for a new employment authorization document (EAD). Eligible Honduran TPS beneficiaries who request an EAD and meet the re-registration deadline will receive a new EAD with an expiration date of Jan. 5, 2015. USCIS recognizes that some re-registrants may not receive their new EADs until after their current EADs expire. Therefore, USCIS is automatically extending current TPS Honduras EADs that have a July 5, 2013, expiration date for an additional six months. These existing EADs are now valid through Jan. 5, 2014.
To re-register, current TPS beneficiaries must submit Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status. TPS re-registrants must also submit Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, but no application fee is required if the re-registrant does not want an EAD. Re-registrants do not need to pay the Form I-821 application fee, but they must submit the biometric services fee, or a fee waiver request, if they are 14 years or older. All TPS re-registrants applying for an EAD must submit the Form I-765 application fee, or a fee waiver request.
TPS applicants may request that USCIS waive any fees by filing a Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a personal letter requesting these fees be waived. Failure to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee waiver request will result in rejection of the entire TPS application.
Applicants can download TPS forms for free from the USCIS website at http://www.uscis.gov/forms. Applicants can also request free TPS forms by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.
Additional information on TPS for Honduras, including guidance on the application process and eligibility, is available online at http://www.uscis.gov/tps. Further details on this extension of TPS for Honduras, including the application requirements and procedures, will appear in a Federal Register notice scheduled for publication on April 3, 2013.
Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online, or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).
For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

ID Required to enter JFK Federal Building

AILA NE President Vincent Lau has informed us that (until further notice) a photo ID will be required to gain entry to the JFK Federal Building in Boston.

Well, the immigration court is in JFK; and while I appreciate the need for additional security - there is a problem. Many people who are placed in removal proceedings have their ID confiscated by ICE. When they show up for court and are turned away - they will get a default judgement against them for not being present.

If you are a client of Drew Law Office and you do not have a photo ID please let us know. We will be monitoring the situation and can file motions to reopen in absentia removal orders if needed.

There isn't much we can do about the really long wait time to get into the building however... so be sure to arrive early.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013

A victory for Latino rights - eldiariony.com

A victory for Latino rights - eldiariony.com

https://ccrjustice.org/ourcases/aguilar-v-ice


An unprecedented settlement with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) sent a loud and needed message: immigration agents cannot run roughshod over the rights of Latinos without consequences.
As of a result of the settlement reached yesterday, ICE must cough up $1 million to 22 Latino victims of warrantless raids. But what is far-reaching is that ICE must change its policies.
Among the court-ordered requirements: ICE agents must seek consent to enter or search a private residence. When the target is from a Spanish-speaking country, the agency must have Spanish-speaking officers available to seek that permission. They cannot conduct sweeps through a home without a real —not imagined or assumed— suspicion of danger.

Thursday, March 28, 2013

CBP Announces Automation of Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record - Drew Law Office, pllc.

CBP Announces Automation of Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record - Drew Law Office, pllc.

CBP Announces Automation of Form I-94 Arrival/Departure RecordEliminates Paper Forms, Streamlines Admission Process
(Thursday, March 21, 2013)

Washington — U.S. Customs and Border Protection today announced that it has submitted to the Federal Register a rule that will automate Form I-94 Arrival/Departure Record to streamline the admissions process for individuals lawfully visiting the United States. Form I-94 provides international visitors evidence they have been lawfully admitted to the U.S. which is necessary to verify alien registration, immigration status, and employment authorization. The automation means that affected visitors will no longer need to fill out a paper form when arriving to the U.S. by air or sea, improving procedures and reducing costs. The change will go into effect 30 days after the rule is published in the Federal Register.
“Automation of the I-94 will increase efficiency and streamline the admission process,” said CBP Deputy Commissioner David V. Aguilar. “Once fully implemented, the process will facilitate security and travel while saving CBP an estimated $15.5 million a year.”
As part of CBP’s work to bring advances in technology and automation to the passenger processing environment, records of admission will now be generated using traveler information already transmitted through electronic means. This change should decrease paperwork for both the officer and the traveler and will allow CBP to better optimize its resources.
*The www.cbp.gov/i94 website will be live 30 days after the rule is published to the Federal Register. www.cbp.gov/I94 )
U.S. Customs and Border Protection is the unified border agency within the Department of Homeland Security charged with the management, control and protection of our nation's borders at and between the official ports of entry. CBP is charged with keeping terrorists and terrorist weapons out of the country while enforcing hundreds of U.S. laws.


I can't see how this could possibly go wrong -- 

Tuesday, March 26, 2013

2013 Poverty Guidelines (DHHS and USCIS) - Drew Law Office, pllc.

2013 Poverty Guidelines (DHHS and USCIS) - Drew Law Office, pllc.


2013 Poverty Guidelines (DHHS and USCIS)

posted Mar 20, 2013, 7:06 AM by Randall Drew
The Department of Health and Human Services publishes the Poverty Guidelines every year. 
And every year USCIS takes way too long to publish their guidelines based on 125% of the
 Poverty Guidelines. It has now been almost two months since the Federal Register Posting 
and there is still no new form I-864P on the USCIS website. You might  think USCIS would
 get some advance notice of the guidelines from DHHS and have the form ready ahead of time
 -- they don't. So I have posted them here ... make sure you doublecheck my math (I rounded up)!

2013 POVERTY GUIDELINES FOR THE 48 CONTIGUOUS STATES

AND THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Persons in family/household    Poverty guideline.  (USCIS = 125%)
        1                                    $11,490                    $14,363
        2                                    $15,510                    $19,388
        3                                    $19,530                    $24,413
        4                                    $23,550                    $29,438
        5                                    $27,570                    $34,463
        6                                    $31,590                    $39,488
        7                                    $35,610                    $44,513
        8                                    $39,630                    $49,538
For families/households with more than 8 persons, add $4,020 for each additional person
 then multiply by 1.25

Wednesday, March 6, 2013

How Private Prisons Game the Immigration System | The Nation

How Private Prisons Game the Immigration System | The Nation

Even if Comprehensive Immigration Reform comes to a vote this year -- in the fine print will almost certainly be more corporate welfare for the well-connected private prison industry. Read this article -- I dare you. When you   attach a profit motive to a traditionally government function ... a few get rich ... and the government (and the tax payer) gets poorer.

Thursday, February 7, 2013

Dream Act To Be Reintroduced In House As Immigration Push Grows

Dream Act To Be Reintroduced In House As Immigration Push Grows
on HuffPo from Elise Foley



WASHINGTON -- Reps. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-Calif.), Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.) and Luis Gutierrez (D-Ill.) will introduce Dream Act legislation near the end this month to help undocumented young people who came to the United States as children, their offices confirmed to HuffPost.
The bill will fall roughly along the lines of the 2010 Dream Act. That bill aimed to allow young undocumented immigrants to gain legal status and eventual citizenship if they entered the United States as children and either joined the military or attended college, along with other requirements.
The three members of Congress are all advocates for broader immigration reform, as well as longtime sponsors of the Dream Act, and Roybal-Allard spokesman Matt Lee said the introduction of the Dream Act bill shouldn't be considered as them backing away from a comprehensive legislative effort.
"This isn’t a substitute or a fall-back for [comprehensive immigration reform]," Lee said in an email. "The members are still strongly committed to passing a broad reform package. The strategy in introducing it now is to build on the momentum that already exists for immigration reform and to highlight the impact of our broken immigration system on the Dreamers and their families."
Gutierrez spokesman Doug Rivlin said in an email that the congressman was "honored" to be invited on as a lead sponsor of the bill.
"The Dream Act is a critical component of comprehensive immigration reform with an amazing organizing network building support for the Dream Act and comprehensive reform and the Congressman is glad to be working with them," he said.
The Dream Act passed the House in 2010 and then failed in the Senate. But while bipartisan groups are working on broader immigration reform legislation this year, the Dream Act has gained some newfound support.
House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.), who voted against the Dream Act three years ago, said on Tuesday that he supports the idea of allowing undocumented young people to become citizens.
"A good place to start is with the kids," he said of immigration reform during a speech at the American Enterprise Institute. "One of the great founding principles of our country was that children would not be punished for the mistakes of their parents. It is time to provide an opportunity for legal residence and citizenship for those who were brought to this country as children and who know no other home."
Speaker John Boehner (R-Ohio) did not give a yes or no answer when asked by reporters on Wednesday whether he would support a Dream Act-style bill, but said he would look at such proposals.
"I want to do everything I can to foster this continuing conversation in a bipartisan fashion to deal with what is a very difficult issue in our country," he told reporters at a press conference. "But it's certainly worthy of consideration."
Other Democrats, meanwhile, reiterated on Thursday that a Dream Act alone is not enough.
"Been there, done that. We've moved on," Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-Calif.), chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, said at a press conference. "I think the American people have moved on. ... I hope that they're going to put it on fast forward on the Republican side when it comes to dealing with immigration reform, because if the playing field for them is 'Dream Act is a good idea,' that's yesterday's news."

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Migration Policy Institute Data Hub NH Foreign Born

There are a bunch more tables and lots of information to see at http://www.migrationinformation.org/datahub/acscensus.cfm
Notes:
1. This table describes the entire population of New Hampshire.
2. For 1990, 2000, and 2011, the total for the region of birth of the foreign born is different from the total foreign born. This is because the 1990 total excludes those who did not report a country of birth and those born at sea, while the 2000 and 2011 totals exclude those born at sea. In 2000 and 2011, individuals who did not report a country of birth were allocated a country (and region) based on various characteristics. Because of this allocation in 2000 and 2011, but not in 1990, the increase for a specific region between 1990 and 2000 is overstated by a small, but unknown, amount.
Sources: US Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey (ACS); US Census Bureau, 1990 Census of Population and Housing and Census 2000, click here.
For information about ACS methodology, sampling error, and nonsampling error, click here.



Table 2. Characteristics of the Foreign-Born Population in New Hampshire, 20111
Number Percent
PERIOD OF ENTRY BY WORLD REGION OF BIRTH
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 26,849 36.4
Entered 1990 to 1999 17,798 24.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 9,571 13.0
Entered before 1980 19,625 26.6
Born in Europe 19,036 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 5,250 27.6
Entered 1990 to 1999 3,308 17.4
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,843 14.9
Entered before 1980 7,635 40.1
Born in Asia 25,712 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 11,752 45.7
Entered 1990 to 1999 8,256 32.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,985 11.6
Entered before 1980 2,719 10.6
Born in Mexico 3,168 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 809 25.5
Entered 1990 to 1999 1,016 32.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 594 18.8
Entered before 1980 749 23.6
Born in Other Parts of Latin America 11,804 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 4,802 40.7
Entered 1990 to 1999 3,002 25.4
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,235 18.9
Entered before 1980 1,765 15.0
Born in Other Areas2 14,123 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 4,236 30.0
Entered 1990 to 1999 2,216 15.7
Entered 1980 to 1989 914 6.5
Entered before 1980 6,757 47.8
CITIZENSHIP STATUS BY PERIOD OF ENTRY
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Not a citizen 35,557 48.2
Naturalized citizen 38,286 51.8
Entered in 2000 or after 26,849 100.0
Not a citizen 21,173 78.9
Naturalized citizen 5,676 21.1
Entered 1990 to 1999 17,798 100.0
Not a citizen 8,234 46.3
Naturalized citizen 9,564 53.7
Entered 1980 to 1989 9,571 100.0
Not a citizen 2,579 26.9
Naturalized citizen 6,992 73.1
Entered before 1980 19,625 100.0
Not a citizen 3,571 18.2
Naturalized citizen 16,054 81.8
GENDER
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 100.0
Male 617,001 49.6
Female 627,350 50.4
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Male 34,059 46.1
Female 39,784 53.9
MARITAL STATUS
Total Native-Born Population Age 15 or Older 1,021,725 100.0
Never married 292,866 28.7
Now married (not separated) 541,255 53.0
Separated 12,205 1.2
Divorced 121,370 11.9
Widowed 54,029 5.3
Total Foreign-Born Population Age 15 or Older 69,217 100.0
Never married 13,013 18.8
Now married (not separated) 43,052 62.2
Separated 1,630 2.4
Divorced 7,206 10.4
Widowed 4,316 6.2
NATIVITY BY AGE
Total Population 1,318,194 100.0
Under 5 67,606 100.0
Native born 66,463 98.3
Foreign born 1,143 1.7
5 to 17 212,063 100.0
Native born 207,211 97.7
Foreign born 4,852 2.3
18 to 24 124,318 100.0
Native born 118,626 95.4
Foreign born 5,692 4.6
25 to 54 543,683 100.0
Native born 502,162 92.4
Foreign born 41,521 7.6
55 and Older 370,524 100.0
Native born 349,889 94.4
Foreign born 20,635 5.6
MEDIAN AGE5
Total Native-Born Population
Median age 41.3 --
Total Foreign-Born Population
Median age 43.0 --
RACE
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 100.0
One race 1,223,692 98.3
White 1,201,628 96.6
Black or African American 7,250 0.6
American Indian and Alaska Native 1,880 0.2
Asian 7,558 0.6
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander N N
Some other race 5,259 0.4
Two or more races 20,659 1.7
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
One race 71,860 97.3
White 39,240 53.1
Black or African American 7,405 10.0
American Indian and Alaska Native 274 7.9
Asian 21,444 29.0
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander N
Some other race 3,497 4.7
Two or more races 1,983 2.7
HISPANIC ORIGIN
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 100.0
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 27,516 2.2
White, not Hispanic or Latino 1,180,357 94.9
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 10,981 14.9
White, not Hispanic or Latino 32,212 43.6
HOUSEHOLD AND FAMILY SIZE5
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351
Average household size 2.46 --
Average family size 2.95 --
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843
Average household size 2.65 --
Average family size 3.16 --
HOUSEHOLD SIZE BY HOUSING TENURE5
Total Native-Born Population
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.60 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.12 --
Total Foreign-Born Population
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.77 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.46 --
Not a Citizen
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.77 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.61 --
Naturalized Citizen
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.77 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.22 --
HOUSEHOLD TYPE5
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 --
In married couple family household -- 63.5
In other household type -- 33.5
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 --
In married couple family household -- 63.0
In other household type -- 33.5
FERTILITY
Total Native-Born Female Population, Ages 15 to 50 291,704 100.0
Women who had a birth in the last 12 months 12,934 4.4
Married (including spouse absent) 10,300 3.5
Unmarried (never married, divorced, and widowed) 2,634 0.9
Total Foreign-Born Female Population, Ages 15 to 50 23,280 100.0
Women who had a birth in the last 12 months 1,248 5.4
Married (including spouse absent) 1,103 4.7
Unmarried (never married, divorced, and widowed) 145 0.6
REGION/COUNTRY OF BIRTH
Total Foreign-Born Population3 73,843 100.0
Europe 19,036 25.8
Northern Europe 5,299 7.2
United Kingdom 4,214 5.7
United Kingdom, excluding England 2,947 4.0
England 1,267 1.7
Ireland 549 0.7
Other Northern Europe 536 0.7
Western Europe 3,824 5.2
France 675 0.9
Germany 2,121 2.9
Other Western Europe 1,028 1.4
Southern Europe 2,506 3.4
Italy 269 0.4
Portugal 984 1.3
Other Southern Europe 1,253 1.7
Eastern Europe 7,398 10.0
Poland 1,113 1.5
Russia 1,551 2.1
Other Eastern Europe 4,734 6.4
Europe, n.e.c.4 9 0.0
Asia 25,712 34.8
Eastern Asia 6,656 9.0
China 3,928 5.3
China, excluding Taiwan 3,365 4.6
Taiwan 563 0.8
Japan 382 0.5
Korea 2,338 3.2
Other Eastern Asia 8 0.0
South Central Asia 9,893 13.4
India 6,654 9.0
Iran 407 0.6
Other South Central Asia 2,832 3.8
Southeastern Asia 6,825 9.2
Philippines 1,527 2.1
Vietnam 1,678 2.3
Other Southeastern Asia 3,620 4.9
Western Asia 2,338 3.2
Israel 171 0.2
Lebanon 786 1.1
Other Western Asia 1,381 1.9
Asia, n.e.c. 4 0 0.0
Africa 4,957 6.7
Eastern Africa 2,549 3.5
Northern Africa 758 1.0
Western Africa 871 1.2
Middle and Southern Africa 779 1.1
Africa, n.e.c. 4 0 0.0
Oceania 469 0.6
Australia and New Zealand Subregion 423 0.6
Oceania, n.e.c. 4 46 0.1
Americas 23,669 32.1
Latin America 14,972 20.3
Caribbean 3,651 4.9
Cuba 520 0.7
Jamaica 758 1.0
Other Caribbean 2,373 3.2
Central America 4,590 6.2
Mexico 3,168 4.3
El Salvador 572 0.8
Other Central America 850 1.2
South America 6,731 9.1
Brazil 1,851 2.5
Colombia 2,784 3.8
Other South America 2,096 2.8
Northern America 8,697 11.8
Canada 8,489 11.5
Other Northern America 208 0.3