Immigration Newsletter

Friday, August 23, 2013

USCIS Working to Correct CPR Cards Issued with Incorrect Expiration Dates - Drew Law Office, pllc.

USCIS Working to Correct CPR Cards Issued with Incorrect Expiration Dates - Drew Law Office, pllc.

USCIS Working to Correct CPR Cards Issued with Incorrect Expiration Dates

Cite as "AILA InfoNet Doc. No. 13082340 (posted Aug. 23, 2013)" 
USCIS recently alerted AILA that approximately 2,300 conditional permanent residence cards were issued with incorrect expiration dates. USCIS is attempting to rectify this by contacting affected individuals via e-mailto provide them with instructions on obtaining a replacement card. USCIS provided the following details regarding this situation:
  • Between July 22 and August 8, 2013, USCIS issued approximately 2,300 new conditional permanent resident cards with an incorrect expiration date. Instead of a two year validity period, those cards were issued with a ten-year validity period.
  • All recipients of these cards are legitimately approved conditional permanent residents; no individual received a green card in error.
  • USCIS has identified each and every conditional permanent resident who received a green card with an incorrect expiration date and has informed those individuals that they must exchange their current card for one with the correct expiration date.
  • Individuals who will need to exchange their green card do not need to file any form or pay any fee.
  • USCIS has contacted all affected individuals and provided them with options to exchange their green cards, either by mail, which is the fastest option, or in-person at a local USCIS office.
If your client received a conditional permanent residence card with a 10-year expiration date and also received an e-mail from USCIS (fromreplacecard@uscis.dhs.gov) with details on exchanging their green card, this e-mail is not a scam.
*** I do not know of any Drew Law Office, PLLC clients who would fall under this category (Conditional Residents [married less than two years] who received a ten year card instead of a two year card). If you think this might be you -- feel free to contact us. Missing the date for filing a Petition to Remove Conditions on Status is a big problem! ***

Voto Latino to March on Washington | Latina

Voto Latino to March on Washington | Latina

Voto Latino will join civil rights leaders on Saturday, August 24 at the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington to call for leaders to expand Latinos' access to the polls and a path to citizenship for aspiring Americans.
Maria Teresa Kumar, President and CEO of Voto Latino, will address a crowd of thousands at the Lincoln Memorial.
“I am honored to join the Rev. Al SharptonMartin Luther King, IIITom JoynerJanet MurguiaBen Jealous and so many others, to not only commemorate a landmark event that happened 50 years ago, but to also give voice to the opportunities our nation can build on if it were to only tap the full potential of American Latinos,” said Kumar in a release.


Read more: http://www.latina.com/lifestyle/politics/voto-latino-march-washington#ixzz2coEGZi3c 
Follow us: @latina on Twitter | latinamagazine on Facebook

Wednesday, August 21, 2013

USCIS - DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

USCIS - DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

DHS Announces Re-designation and 18-Month Extension of Temporary Protected Status for Syria

Released Jun 17, 2013
WASHINGTON—Secretary of Homeland Security Janet Napolitano has re-designated Syria for Temporary Protected Status (TPS) and extended the existing TPS designation for the country from Oct. 1, 2013, through March 31, 2015. This allows eligible nationals of Syria to register or re-register for TPS in accordance with a notice published today in the Federal Register. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) encourages eligible individuals to register or re-register as soon as possible.


Who’s EligibleCurrent TPS StatusWhen to File
Syrian nationals (and individuals without nationality who last habitually resided in Syria)Have TPSMust re-register during a 60-day re-registration period that runs from June 17, 2013 through Aug. 16, 2013.
Have a Pending TPS Application with USCISYou do not need to file a re-registration application during this extension. USCIS will continue to process your pending application.
Do Not Have TPSMay apply for TPS during a 180-day registration period that runs from June 17, 2013 through Dec. 16, 2013.

A Syrian national, or an individual having no nationality who last habitually resided in Syria, may be eligible for TPS under the re-designation if he or she has continuously resided in the United States since June 17, 2013 and has been continuously physically present in the United States since Oct. 1, 2013. In addition to the continuous residence date requirement, applicants must meet all other TPS eligibility and filing requirements.
During the past year, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the Department of State (DOS) reviewed the conditions in Syria. Based upon this review, Secretary Napolitano has determined that a re-designation and 18-month extension of TPS for Syria is warranted. The extension of the current Syria TPS designation and re-designation is due to the continued disruption of living conditions in the country that are a result of the extraordinary and temporary conditions that led to the initial TPS designation of Syria in 2012. The extension is based on ongoing armed conflict in that region and the continued deterioration of country conditions.
DHS anticipates that there are approximately 2,600 individuals who will be eligible to re-register for TPS under the existing designation of Syria and estimates that approximately 9,000 additional individuals might be eligible to apply for TPS under the re-designation.
Individuals applying for TPS for the first time must submit:
  • Form I-821, Application for Temporary Protected Status;
  • The Form I-821 application fee;
  • Form I-765, Application for Employment Authorization, regardless of whether they want an Employment Authorization Document (EAD);
  • The biometrics services fee if they are age 14 or older; and
  • The Form I-765 application fee, but only if they want an EAD and are 14 to 65 years old. Those under age 14 or age 66 and older do not need to pay the Form I-765 fee with their initial TPS application.
Individuals re-registering for TPS must submit:
Individuals who still have a pending initial TPS application under Syria do not need to submit a new Form I-821. However, if these individuals want a new EAD, they should submit:
Applicants may request that USCIS waive any or all fees based on inability to pay by filing Form I-912, Request for Fee Waiver, or by submitting a written request. Fee-waiver requests must be accompanied by supporting documentation. Failure to submit the required filing fees or a properly documented fee-waiver request will result in the rejection of the TPS application.
All USCIS forms are free. Applicants can download TPS forms from the USCIS website at www.uscis.gov/forms or request them by calling USCIS toll-free at 1-800-870-3676.
Additional information on TPS for Syria—including guidance on eligibility, the application process, and where to file—is available online at www.uscis.gov/tps. Further details on this extension and re-designation of Syria for TPS, including application requirements and procedures, are available in theFederal Register notice published today.

Applicants seeking information about the status of their individual cases can check My Case Status Online or call the USCIS National Customer Service Center at 1-800-375-5283 (TTY 1-800-767-1833).
For more information on USCIS and its programs, please visit www.uscis.gov or follow us on Facebook (USCIS), Twitter (@uscis), YouTube (/uscis) and the USCIS blog The Beacon.

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Deferred Action Immigration Program In First Year Aids More Than 400,000

Deferred Action Immigration Program In First Year Aids More Than 400,000

Click on the link to see the rest of the story from Elise Foley at The Huffington Post

WASHINGTON -- One year ago on Thursday, undocumented young peopleturned out by the thousands across the country to apply for a new government program that allows them to stay in the U.S., work and remain safe, for now, from deportation.
A report released Wednesday by the Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program provides new information on the so-called Dreamers who applied for Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals relief beginning on Aug. 15, 2012.
There are more than 557,000 of them, and nearly 72 percent -- 400,562 -- had been approved for the program as of the end of June. Those Dreamers came to the U.S. as children from around the world, although a majority were born in Mexico, according to the report authored by Brookings senior fellow Audrey Singer and analyst Nicole Prchal Svajlenka. Nearly three-quarters of those Dreamers had been in the country for more than a decade by the time they applied for deferred action, and one-third entered before they were 5 years old. Most applicants were ages 15 to 23, with only about one-quarter of them older than 24, the Brookings report found.

Drew Law Office, PLLC

Thursday, August 8, 2013

ACLU - Know Your Rights

ACLU Know Your Rights pamphlet

I have downloaded and read this pamphlet myself. Good information to know. It is not always easy to stand up for your rights. Still, these are good things to know and remember.

Tuesday, August 6, 2013

First on CNN: Iowa’s Steve King heading to South Carolina – CNN Political Ticker - CNN.com Blogs

First on CNN: Iowa’s Steve King heading to South Carolina – CNN Political Ticker - CNN.com Blogs

Click the link above for the rest of the story -- here is all I could stand to reprint.

... If King is curious about seeking the Republican nomination in 2016, as his visit to South Carolina suggests, he would certainly face difficult odds, since no sitting member of the House has been elected president since James Garfield in 1880.
King, though, would have a national platform to discuss his policy ideas and might appeal to elements of the Republican base that remain firmly opposed to the immigration reform bill – "amnesty," in his words - that recently passed the Senate.
He would also add a wrinkle to the Iowa caucuses, given that he represents a conservative and heavily evangelical district in northwest Iowa that figures prominently in the leadoff nominating contest.