Immigration Law News NH and beyond

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Immigration Newsletter

Thursday, January 31, 2013

Migration Policy Institute Data Hub NH Foreign Born

There are a bunch more tables and lots of information to see at http://www.migrationinformation.org/datahub/acscensus.cfm
Notes:
1. This table describes the entire population of New Hampshire.
2. For 1990, 2000, and 2011, the total for the region of birth of the foreign born is different from the total foreign born. This is because the 1990 total excludes those who did not report a country of birth and those born at sea, while the 2000 and 2011 totals exclude those born at sea. In 2000 and 2011, individuals who did not report a country of birth were allocated a country (and region) based on various characteristics. Because of this allocation in 2000 and 2011, but not in 1990, the increase for a specific region between 1990 and 2000 is overstated by a small, but unknown, amount.
Sources: US Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey (ACS); US Census Bureau, 1990 Census of Population and Housing and Census 2000, click here.
For information about ACS methodology, sampling error, and nonsampling error, click here.



Table 2. Characteristics of the Foreign-Born Population in New Hampshire, 20111
Number Percent
PERIOD OF ENTRY BY WORLD REGION OF BIRTH
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 26,849 36.4
Entered 1990 to 1999 17,798 24.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 9,571 13.0
Entered before 1980 19,625 26.6
Born in Europe 19,036 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 5,250 27.6
Entered 1990 to 1999 3,308 17.4
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,843 14.9
Entered before 1980 7,635 40.1
Born in Asia 25,712 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 11,752 45.7
Entered 1990 to 1999 8,256 32.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,985 11.6
Entered before 1980 2,719 10.6
Born in Mexico 3,168 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 809 25.5
Entered 1990 to 1999 1,016 32.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 594 18.8
Entered before 1980 749 23.6
Born in Other Parts of Latin America 11,804 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 4,802 40.7
Entered 1990 to 1999 3,002 25.4
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,235 18.9
Entered before 1980 1,765 15.0
Born in Other Areas2 14,123 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 4,236 30.0
Entered 1990 to 1999 2,216 15.7
Entered 1980 to 1989 914 6.5
Entered before 1980 6,757 47.8
CITIZENSHIP STATUS BY PERIOD OF ENTRY
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Not a citizen 35,557 48.2
Naturalized citizen 38,286 51.8
Entered in 2000 or after 26,849 100.0
Not a citizen 21,173 78.9
Naturalized citizen 5,676 21.1
Entered 1990 to 1999 17,798 100.0
Not a citizen 8,234 46.3
Naturalized citizen 9,564 53.7
Entered 1980 to 1989 9,571 100.0
Not a citizen 2,579 26.9
Naturalized citizen 6,992 73.1
Entered before 1980 19,625 100.0
Not a citizen 3,571 18.2
Naturalized citizen 16,054 81.8
GENDER
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 100.0
Male 617,001 49.6
Female 627,350 50.4
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Male 34,059 46.1
Female 39,784 53.9
MARITAL STATUS
Total Native-Born Population Age 15 or Older 1,021,725 100.0
Never married 292,866 28.7
Now married (not separated) 541,255 53.0
Separated 12,205 1.2
Divorced 121,370 11.9
Widowed 54,029 5.3
Total Foreign-Born Population Age 15 or Older 69,217 100.0
Never married 13,013 18.8
Now married (not separated) 43,052 62.2
Separated 1,630 2.4
Divorced 7,206 10.4
Widowed 4,316 6.2
NATIVITY BY AGE
Total Population 1,318,194 100.0
Under 5 67,606 100.0
Native born 66,463 98.3
Foreign born 1,143 1.7
5 to 17 212,063 100.0
Native born 207,211 97.7
Foreign born 4,852 2.3
18 to 24 124,318 100.0
Native born 118,626 95.4
Foreign born 5,692 4.6
25 to 54 543,683 100.0
Native born 502,162 92.4
Foreign born 41,521 7.6
55 and Older 370,524 100.0
Native born 349,889 94.4
Foreign born 20,635 5.6
MEDIAN AGE5
Total Native-Born Population
Median age 41.3 --
Total Foreign-Born Population
Median age 43.0 --
RACE
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 100.0
One race 1,223,692 98.3
White 1,201,628 96.6
Black or African American 7,250 0.6
American Indian and Alaska Native 1,880 0.2
Asian 7,558 0.6
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander N N
Some other race 5,259 0.4
Two or more races 20,659 1.7
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
One race 71,860 97.3
White 39,240 53.1
Black or African American 7,405 10.0
American Indian and Alaska Native 274 7.9
Asian 21,444 29.0
Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander N
Some other race 3,497 4.7
Two or more races 1,983 2.7
HISPANIC ORIGIN
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 100.0
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 27,516 2.2
White, not Hispanic or Latino 1,180,357 94.9
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 100.0
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 10,981 14.9
White, not Hispanic or Latino 32,212 43.6
HOUSEHOLD AND FAMILY SIZE5
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351
Average household size 2.46 --
Average family size 2.95 --
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843
Average household size 2.65 --
Average family size 3.16 --
HOUSEHOLD SIZE BY HOUSING TENURE5
Total Native-Born Population
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.60 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.12 --
Total Foreign-Born Population
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.77 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.46 --
Not a Citizen
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.77 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.61 --
Naturalized Citizen
Average household size of owner-occupied unit 2.77 --
Average household size of renter-occupied unit 2.22 --
HOUSEHOLD TYPE5
Total Native-Born Population 1,244,351 --
In married couple family household -- 63.5
In other household type -- 33.5
Total Foreign-Born Population 73,843 --
In married couple family household -- 63.0
In other household type -- 33.5
FERTILITY
Total Native-Born Female Population, Ages 15 to 50 291,704 100.0
Women who had a birth in the last 12 months 12,934 4.4
Married (including spouse absent) 10,300 3.5
Unmarried (never married, divorced, and widowed) 2,634 0.9
Total Foreign-Born Female Population, Ages 15 to 50 23,280 100.0
Women who had a birth in the last 12 months 1,248 5.4
Married (including spouse absent) 1,103 4.7
Unmarried (never married, divorced, and widowed) 145 0.6
REGION/COUNTRY OF BIRTH
Total Foreign-Born Population3 73,843 100.0
Europe 19,036 25.8
Northern Europe 5,299 7.2
United Kingdom 4,214 5.7
United Kingdom, excluding England 2,947 4.0
England 1,267 1.7
Ireland 549 0.7
Other Northern Europe 536 0.7
Western Europe 3,824 5.2
France 675 0.9
Germany 2,121 2.9
Other Western Europe 1,028 1.4
Southern Europe 2,506 3.4
Italy 269 0.4
Portugal 984 1.3
Other Southern Europe 1,253 1.7
Eastern Europe 7,398 10.0
Poland 1,113 1.5
Russia 1,551 2.1
Other Eastern Europe 4,734 6.4
Europe, n.e.c.4 9 0.0
Asia 25,712 34.8
Eastern Asia 6,656 9.0
China 3,928 5.3
China, excluding Taiwan 3,365 4.6
Taiwan 563 0.8
Japan 382 0.5
Korea 2,338 3.2
Other Eastern Asia 8 0.0
South Central Asia 9,893 13.4
India 6,654 9.0
Iran 407 0.6
Other South Central Asia 2,832 3.8
Southeastern Asia 6,825 9.2
Philippines 1,527 2.1
Vietnam 1,678 2.3
Other Southeastern Asia 3,620 4.9
Western Asia 2,338 3.2
Israel 171 0.2
Lebanon 786 1.1
Other Western Asia 1,381 1.9
Asia, n.e.c. 4 0 0.0
Africa 4,957 6.7
Eastern Africa 2,549 3.5
Northern Africa 758 1.0
Western Africa 871 1.2
Middle and Southern Africa 779 1.1
Africa, n.e.c. 4 0 0.0
Oceania 469 0.6
Australia and New Zealand Subregion 423 0.6
Oceania, n.e.c. 4 46 0.1
Americas 23,669 32.1
Latin America 14,972 20.3
Caribbean 3,651 4.9
Cuba 520 0.7
Jamaica 758 1.0
Other Caribbean 2,373 3.2
Central America 4,590 6.2
Mexico 3,168 4.3
El Salvador 572 0.8
Other Central America 850 1.2
South America 6,731 9.1
Brazil 1,851 2.5
Colombia 2,784 3.8
Other South America 2,096 2.8
Northern America 8,697 11.8
Canada 8,489 11.5
Other Northern America 208 0.3

Migration Policy Institute MPI Data Hub -- Source: New Hampshire Fact Sheet

Source: New Hampshire Fact Sheet

Here is a sample of what can be found at the Migration Policy Institute website -- check it out lots more interesting information about New Hampshire and all of the states.
======

Notes:

1. This table describes the entire population of New Hampshire.

2. For 1990, 2000, and 2011, the total for the region of birth of the foreign born is different from
the total foreign born. This is because the 1990 total excludes those who did not report a country of birth and those born at sea, while the 2000 and 2011 totals exclude those born at sea. In 2000 and 2011, individuals who did not report a country of birth were allocated a country (and region) based on various characteristics. Because of this allocation in 2000 and 2011, but not in 1990, the increase for a specific region between 1990 and
2000 is overstated by a small, but unknown, amount.

Sources: US Census Bureau, 2011 American Community Survey (ACS); US Census Bureau, 1990 Census of
Population and Housing and Census 2000,
click here.

For information about ACS methodology, sampling error, and nonsampling
error, click
here
.













Table 2.
Characteristics of the Foreign-Born Population in New Hampshire,
20111








Number Percent
PERIOD OF ENTRY
BY WORLD REGION OF BIRTH
Total Foreign-Born
Population
73,843 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 26,849 36.4
Entered 1990 to 1999 17,798 24.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 9,571 13.0
Entered before 1980 19,625 26.6
Born in Europe 19,036 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 5,250 27.6
Entered 1990 to 1999 3,308 17.4
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,843 14.9
Entered before 1980 7,635 40.1
Born in Asia 25,712 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 11,752 45.7
Entered 1990 to 1999 8,256 32.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,985 11.6
Entered before 1980 2,719 10.6
Born in Mexico 3,168 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 809 25.5
Entered 1990 to 1999 1,016 32.1
Entered 1980 to 1989 594 18.8
Entered before 1980 749 23.6
Born in Other
Parts of Latin America
11,804 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 4,802 40.7
Entered 1990 to 1999 3,002 25.4
Entered 1980 to 1989 2,235 18.9
Entered before 1980 1,765 15.0
Born in Other
Areas2
14,123 100.0
Entered in 2000 or after 4,236 30.0
Entered 1990 to 1999 2,216 15.7
Entered 1980 to 1989 914 6.5
Entered before 1980 6,757 47.8
CITIZENSHIP STATUS
BY PERIOD OF ENTRY
Total Foreign-Born
Population
73,843 100.0
Not a citizen 35,557 48.2
Naturalized citizen 38,286 51.8
Entered in 2000
or after
26,849 100.0
Not a citizen 21,173 78.9
Naturalized citizen 5,676 21.1
Entered 1990 to
1999
17,798 100.0
Not a citizen 8,234 46.3
Naturalized citizen 9,564 53.7
Entered 1980 to
1989
9,571 100.0
Not a citizen 2,579 26.9
Naturalized citizen 6,992 73.1
Entered before
1980
19,625 100.0
Not a citizen 3,571 18.2
Naturalized citizen 16,054 81.8
GENDER
Total Native-Born
Population
1,244,351 100.0
Male 617,001 49.6
Female 627,350 50.4
Total Foreign-Born
Population
73,843 100.0
Male 34,059 46.1
Female 39,784 53.9
MARITAL STATUS
Total Native-Born
Population Age 15 or Older
1,021,725 100.0
Never married 292,866 28.7
Now married (not separated) 541,255 53.0
Separated 12,205 1.2
Divorced 121,370 11.9
Widowed 54,029 5.3
Total Foreign-Born
Population Age 15 or Older
69,217 100.0
Never married 13,013 18.8
Now married (not separated) 43,052 62.2
Separated 1,630 2.4
Divorced 7,206 10.4
Widowed 4,316 6.2
NATIVITY BY
AGE
Total Population 1,318,194 100.0
Under 5 67,606 100.0
Native born 66,463 98.3
Foreign born 1,143 1.7
5 to 17 212,063 100.0
Native born 207,211 97.7
Foreign born 4,852 2.3
18 to 24 124,318 100.0
Native born 118,626 95.4
Foreign born 5,692 4.6
25 to 54 543,683 100.0
Native born 502,162 92.4
Foreign born 41,521 7.6
55 and Older 370,524 100.0
Native born 349,889 94.4
Foreign born 20,635 5.6
MEDIAN AGE5
Total Native-Born
Population
Median age 41.3 --
Total Foreign-Born
Population
Median age 43.0 --
RACE
Total Native-Born
Population
1,244,351 100.0
One race 1,223,692 98.3
White 1,201,628 96.6
Black or African
American
7,250 0.6
American Indian
and Alaska Native
1,880 0.2
Asian 7,558 0.6
Native Hawaiian
and other Pacific Islander
N N
Some other
race
5,259 0.4
Two or more races 20,659 1.7
Total Foreign-Born
Population
73,843 100.0
One race 71,860 97.3
White 39,240 53.1
Black or African
American
7,405 10.0
American Indian
and Alaska Native
274 7.9
Asian 21,444 29.0
Native Hawaiian
and other Pacific Islander
N
Some other
race
3,497 4.7
Two or more races 1,983 2.7
HISPANIC ORIGIN
Total Native-Born
Population
1,244,351 100.0
Hispanic or Latino (of
any race)
27,516 2.2
White, not Hispanic or Latino 1,180,357 94.9
Total Foreign-Born
Population
73,843 100.0
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 10,981 14.9
White, not Hispanic or Latino 32,212 43.6
HOUSEHOLD AND FAMILY SIZE5
Total Native-Born
Population
1,244,351
Average household size 2.46 --
Average family size 2.95 --
Total Foreign-Born
Population
73,843
Average household size 2.65 --
Average family size 3.16 --
HOUSEHOLD SIZE BY HOUSING TENURE5
Total Native-Born
Population
Average household size
of owner-occupied unit
2.60 --
Average household size
of renter-occupied unit
2.12 --
Total Foreign-Born
Population
Average household size
of owner-occupied unit
2.77 --
Average household size
of renter-occupied unit
2.46 --
Not
a Citizen
Average
household size of owner-occupied unit
2.77 --
Average household
size of renter-occupied unit
2.61 --
Naturalized
Citizen
Average
household size of owner-occupied unit
2.77 --
Average household
size of renter-occupied unit
2.22 --
HOUSEHOLD TYPE5
Total Native-Born
Population
1,244,351 --
In married couple family
household
-- 63.5
In other household type -- 33.5
Total Foreign-Born
Population
73,843 --
In married couple family
household
-- 63.0
In other household type -- 33.5
FERTILITY
Total Native-Born
Female Population, Ages 15 to 50
291,704 100.0
Women who had a birth
in the last 12 months
12,934 4.4
Married (including spouse
absent)
10,300 3.5
Unmarried (never married,
divorced, and widowed)
2,634 0.9
Total Foreign-Born
Female Population, Ages 15 to 50
23,280 100.0
Women who had a birth
in the last 12 months
1,248 5.4
Married (including spouse
absent)
1,103 4.7
Unmarried (never married,
divorced, and widowed)
145 0.6
REGION/COUNTRY
OF BIRTH
Total Foreign-Born
Population3
73,843 100.0
Europe 19,036 25.8
Northern Europe 5,299 7.2
United Kingdom 4,214 5.7
United Kingdom, excluding
England
2,947 4.0
England 1,267 1.7
Ireland 549 0.7
Other Northern Europe 536 0.7
Western Europe 3,824 5.2
France 675 0.9
Germany 2,121 2.9
Other Western Europe 1,028 1.4
Southern Europe 2,506 3.4
Italy 269 0.4
Portugal 984 1.3
Other Southern Europe 1,253 1.7
Eastern Europe 7,398 10.0
Poland 1,113 1.5
Russia 1,551 2.1
Other Eastern Europe 4,734 6.4
Europe, n.e.c.4 9 0.0
Asia 25,712 34.8
Eastern Asia 6,656 9.0
China 3,928 5.3
China, excluding Taiwan 3,365 4.6
Taiwan 563 0.8
Japan 382 0.5
Korea 2,338 3.2
Other Eastern Asia 8 0.0
South Central Asia 9,893 13.4
India 6,654 9.0
Iran 407 0.6
Other South Central Asia 2,832 3.8
Southeastern Asia 6,825 9.2
Philippines 1,527 2.1
Vietnam 1,678 2.3
Other Southeastern Asia 3,620 4.9
Western Asia 2,338 3.2
Israel 171 0.2
Lebanon 786 1.1
Other Western Asia 1,381 1.9
Asia, n.e.c. 4 0 0.0
Africa 4,957 6.7
Eastern Africa 2,549 3.5
Northern Africa 758 1.0
Western Africa 871 1.2
Middle and Southern Africa 779 1.1
Africa, n.e.c. 4 0 0.0
Oceania 469 0.6
Australia and New Zealand
Subregion
423 0.6
Oceania, n.e.c. 4 46 0.1
Americas 23,669 32.1
Latin America 14,972 20.3
Caribbean 3,651 4.9
Cuba 520 0.7
Jamaica 758 1.0
Other Caribbean 2,373 3.2
Central America 4,590 6.2
Mexico 3,168 4.3
El Salvador 572 0.8
Other Central America 850 1.2
South America 6,731 9.1
Brazil 1,851 2.5
Colombia 2,784 3.8
Other South America 2,096 2.8
Northern America 8,697 11.8
Canada 8,489 11.5
Other Northern America 208 0.3


Monday, January 28, 2013

Senators Agree on Blueprint for Immigration - NYTimes.com

Senators Agree on Blueprint for Immigration - NYTimes.com



A bipartisan group of senators has agreed on a set of principles for a sweeping overhaul of the immigration system, including a pathway to American citizenship for 11 million illegal immigrants that would hinge on progress in securing the borders and ensuring that foreigners leave the country when their visas expire.

The senators were able to reach a deal by incorporating the Democrats’ insistence on a single comprehensive bill that would not deny eventual citizenship to illegal immigrants, with Republican demands that strong border and interior enforcement had to be clearly in place before Congress could consider legal status for illegal immigrants.
Their blueprint, set to be unveiled on Monday, will allow them to stake out their position one day before President Obama outlines his immigration proposals in a speech on Tuesday in Las Vegas, in the opening moves of what lawmakers expect will be a protracted and contentious debate in Congress this year.
Lawmakers said they were optimistic that the political mood had changed since a similar effort collapsed in acrimony in 2010. Senator John McCain, Republican of Arizona and one of the negotiators, said he saw “a new appreciation” among Republicans of the need for an overhaul.
“Look at the last election,” Mr. McCain said Sunday morning on ABC’s “This Week With George Stephanopoulos.” “We are losing dramatically the Hispanic vote, which we think should be ours.” The senator also said he had seen “significant improvements” in border enforcement, although “we’ve still got a ways to go.”

click the link above to see the rest of the article at NYT

Transcript: Bipartisan Framework for Comprehensive Immigration Reform - ABC News

Transcript: Bipartisan Framework for Comprehensive Immigration Reform - ABC News


From Senators Chuck Schumer, John McCain, Dick Durbin, Lindsey Graham, Robert Menendez, Marco Rubio, Michael Bennet, and Jeff Flake
Introduction:
We recognize that our immigration system is broken. And while border security has improved significantly over the last two Administrations, we still don't have a functioning immigration system. This has created a situation where up to 11 million undocumented immigrants are living in the shadows. Our legislation acknowledges these realities by finally committing the resources needed to secure the border, modernize and streamline our current legal immigration system, while creating a tough but fair legalization program for individuals who are currently here. We will ensure that this is a successful permanent reform to our immigration system that will not need to be revisited.
Four Basic Legislative Pillars:
1. Create a tough but fair path to citizenship for unauthorized immigrants currently living in the United States that is contingent upon securing our borders and tracking whether legal immigrants have left the country when required;
2. Reform our legal immigration system to better recognize the importance of characteristics that will help build the American economy and strengthen American families;
3. Create an effective employment verification system that will prevent identity theft and end the hiring of future unauthorized workers; and,
4. Establish an improved process for admitting future workers to serve our nation's workforce needs, while simultaneously protecting all workers.

Friday, January 25, 2013

Jeb Bush and Clint Bolick: Solving the Immigration Puzzle - WSJ.com

Jeb Bush and Clint Bolick: Solving the Immigration Puzzle - WSJ.com


The nation's capital is awash with ideas about how to fix America's immigration policy. The sudden ferment on this issue, which was largely dormant since efforts at comprehensive reform were torpedoed five years ago, is as welcome as it is overdue. The growing consensus on both sides of the political aisle that something needs to be done should not be squandered, for such opportunities are rare and fleeting.
Some policy makers are calling for piecemeal changes—such as issuing visas for high-skilled workers and investors, or conferring legal status on immigrants who were illegally brought into the country as children. Congress should avoid such quick fixes and commit itself instead to comprehensive immigration reform.
In some conservative circles, the word "comprehensive" in the context of immigration reform is an epithet—a code word for amnesty. People who oppose such reform declare that securing the United States border must come before moving toward broader reform.
Such an approach is shortsighted and self-defeating. Border security is inextricably intertwined with other aspects of immigration policy. The best way to prevent illegal immigration is to make sure that we have a fair and workable system of legal immigration. The current immigration system is neither.
David Klein
The immigration system is like a jigsaw puzzle. If one or more pieces are out of whack, the puzzle makes no sense. To fix the system, Congress must make sure all of the pieces fit together, logically and snugly....

To see the rest of this article in the WSJ click the link above.

Friday, January 18, 2013

Immigration advocates promise to put 'muscle' behind reform push - The Hill

Immigration advocates promise to put 'muscle' behind reform push - The Hill

Click on the link above to go to the full article at THE HILL.

Essentially, the gist of the article is that a critical mass is beginning to form in support of immigration reform. Labor and Management, Liberal and Conservative, Republican and Democrat. Elections have consequences.

If new legislation is passed you will find it here, and at my office website www.drewpllc.com
Drew Law Office also has sites on Facebook www.facebook.com/DrewLawOffice
and Google+ and LinkedIn.

Attorney Randall Drew also has a twitter account and we have another blog called: New Hampshire Immigration Lawyer Blog so one way or another -- when Comprehensive Immigration Reform passes Congress -- Drew Law Office, PLLC will get the word out in New Hampshire and beyond.

Thursday, January 17, 2013

Why This Round of Immigration Reform Is Different - COLORLINES

Why This Round of Immigration Reform Is Different - COLORLINES by Pramila Jayapal

Participants in a protest against Alabama’s HB-56 march through Linn Park on June 25, 2011, in Birmingham, Ala. (AP Photo/ The Birmingham News, Mark Almond)



Senior Administration officials told The New York Times this week that President Obama intends to move an “ambitious” and comprehensive push for immigration reform through Congress in the coming months. Four years ago, it was a very different situation. Progressive groups—dizzy from the win of the first African-American president and his preacher’s call for change—had a long list of competing priorities for the president, with the economy and health care winning out. Understanding how immigration reform “earned” its way to the top of the progressive agenda should shape the movement’s strategy in the coming months.
Two major changes have taken place. First, the movement has grown in numbers and matured in sophistication, generating a new collective urgency among liberals on this issue. Second, the combination of demographic change and growing immigrant power have challenged Republicans, in particular, to get behind reform. How well the movement optimizes these trends will be key to getting the best reform possible and capitalizing on the unprecedented opportunity to win immigration reform in 2013.
click the link above to see the rest of the article on COLORLINES.

I am really hoping that we get some reform this year. When it happens we will note it here and on the Law Firm website: www.drewpllc.com

AG: DMV should issue licenses to young illegal immigrants :: WRAL.com

AG: DMV should issue licenses to young illegal immigrants :: WRAL.com


The state Attorney General's Office has determined that people who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children are entitled to a North Carolina driver's license if they meet all other requirements.
The Division of Motor Vehicles last week canceled the licenses of 13 people who have applied to the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, saying they wanted a legal opinion from the Attorney General's Office on whether issuing the licenses would violate state law.
The DACA program blocks deportation of and grants work permits to immigrants brought to the United States as minors without authorization. North Carolina typically grants driver's licenses to non-citizens with valid federal work papers.
"We believe that individuals who present documentation demonstrating a grant of deferred action by the United States government are legally present in the United States and entitled to a driver's license of limited duration, assuming all other criteria are met," Chief Deputy Attorney General Grayson Kelley wrote in a letter Thursday to DMV Acting Commissioner Eric Boyette.
"This conclusion should not be construed to suggest that individuals granted deferred status under the DACA program have 'lawful status' in the United States," Kelley wrote. "Deferred status ... is a grant of permission to remain in the country for a specified period of time without receiving formal immigration status. The grant of deferred status therefore establishes lawful presence for the period of deferment."