Immigration Newsletter

Thursday, December 18, 2014

NHPR's New Hampshire's Immigration Story Page

http://nhpr.org/topic/nhs-immigration-story

NHPR has a page online with a bunch of interesting stories and interviews about immigration in NH. From history to current events ... check it out if you are interested and have some time.






Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Monday, December 15, 2014

NHBA - Bar News Issue

NHBA - Bar News Issue

Bar News - December 17, 2014


Opinion: A NH Immigration Lawyer’s Perspective on Executive Action

By: 

Perhaps you have heard that President Barack Obama recently declared himself King and tore up the Constitution to thwart the rule of law regarding immigration. Well, that’s not exactly true. The president did give a speech and published two presidential memoranda on immigration. Those two memos, however, were both rather vague and announced some pretty uncontroversial ideas, such as “…streamline and improve the legal immigration system…” and “...modernize the information technology infrastructure underlying the visa processing system…”
The controversial policy changes have been left to the cabinet members of the relevant agencies; particularly Homeland Security and Labor. There are several changes coming to the inner workings of the immigration system – things that should improve the efficiency and customer service aspects of the bureaucracy quite a lot. But nobody cares about that, unless they are trying to hire an immigrant worker, petition for a family member, or work on immigration cases, as I do.
The really big news about the executive action is the shift of enforcement resources away from “wide net” interior sweep toward a targeted approach against dangerous criminals and recent arrivals, and concentrating on the Southwestern border. As part of this kinder/gentler approach, the secretary of Homeland Security (at the president’s direction) has expanded the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) and created an additional class of persons eligible for deferred action: parents of US citizen or lawful permanent resident children. This new program is called the Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA).
Is this executive amnesty? Not really. Amnesty implies forgiveness of a violation of immigration law (e.g. illegal entry or visa overstay) and a path to permanent status or citizenship. DACA and DAPA provide only a temporary formal deferral of a person’s removal from the United States. It does not end the threat that eventually, even a DACA or DAPA beneficiary will face deportation. What DACA and DAPA have done and will do is allow some people who have been living here without documents to come out of the shadows; get temporary permission to work, obtain a legitimate social security number, file a proper tax return, and get a legal driver’s license. It allows people to stop breaking the law out of necessity.
If you are in the self-deportation camp (the philosophy that we should make living here such an awful and treacherous experience that undocumented people will voluntarily choose to leave) you are not going to like these measures. I really can’t help with that. I would only point out that we are talking about persons who entered the United States when they were children and/or are parents of US citizen children and who have resided in the country since 2009. I personally am not interested in discovering how spiteful, horrid, petty and mean we can be to these folks – but maybe that’s just me.
Sure, I am biased; this will be good for my business. In truth, I also am hoping that these program changes will last long enough to see a comprehensive immigration reform act pass through Congress. But, biased or not, I also have likely met more immigrants (legal or otherwise) than many Bar News readers, in my close to 20 years as an immigration lawyer. That is how I know that many of them will flourish when given this chance.
Having even a temporary status can allow them to seek a better job for higher wages, pursue higher education (although without financial assistance), and have some stability to make financial decisions like renting a better apartment, registering a car, opening a bank account – things many of us take for granted. These are all positives for the previously undocumented and for the state’s economy and public safety in general.
commented here back in May on a change to NH law for 2015 that will increase the penalty for first offense driving without a license from a violation to a misdemeanor, if the driver had never had a valid license. I suspect this change will mostly impact undocumented immigrants who are not eligible to receive a New Hampshire driver’s license. Yet they still have to get kids to school, bring home groceries from the store, and get to work and back – usually on a non-Uber-ready budget. For some, but by no means all, DACA and DAPA will change that, so they can stop looking over their shoulders and get on with living their lives.


 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Monday, December 8, 2014

Launch of In-Country Refugee/Parole Program for Children in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras with Parents Lawfully Present in the United States

from the US Dept. of State website





Launch of In-Country Refugee/Parole Program for Children in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras with Parents Lawfully Present in the United States



Today, the United States is announcing the official launch of an in-country refugee/parole program in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras to provide a safe, legal, and orderly alternative to the dangerous journey that some children are currently undertaking to the United States. This program will allow certain parents from one of these three countries who are lawfully present in the United States to request to bring their children to the United States as refugees via the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program. Children who are found ineligible for refugee admission but still at risk of harm may be considered for parole on a case-by-case basis. The refugee/parole program will not be a pathway for undocumented parents to bring their children to the United States. Instead, the program will provide certain vulnerable, at-risk children with an opportunity to be reunited with parents lawfully present in the United States.
A fact sheet in English and Spanish describing the program can be found on the Department of State website at:http://www.state.gov/j/prm/releases/factsheets/2014/234067.htm
Applications for this program may be initiated by a lawfully present parent in the United States. Form DS-7699 must be filed with the assistance of a designated resettlement agency that works with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration to help resettle refugees in the United States. Parents do not need to pay any fee to file this form or for assistance in completing and submitting the form, but they are expected to cover the initial costs of DNA testing to confirm claimed biological parent-child relationships. Costs of DNA testing are reimbursable under certain circumstances. Form DS-7699 will not be available on the Department of State website to the general public and cannot be completed without the assistance of a Department of State-funded resettlement agency. These nearly 350 resettlement agency affiliates are located in more than 180 communities throughout the United States. Additional information about the program, as well as a list of the resettlement agency affiliates that can assist with filing the DS-7699 can be found at: http://www.wrapsnet.org/CAMProgram/tabid/420/Default.aspx






 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Obama’s immigration actions: an overview - New Hampshire Business Review - December 12 2014

Obama’s immigration actions: an overview - New Hampshire Business Review - December 12 2014



Contrary to many media reports, President Obama did not issue any executive orders on immigration in November. He did deliver a speech and two presidential memoranda on immigration, but both are very general in nature and mostly offer aspirational goals.
The real changes take shape in a series of companion memoranda issued by the Departments of Homeland Security and Labor detailing how the executive action is to be carried out.
Some of the changes represent a sharp break from past practices and might be litigated, overridden by Congress, or revoked by the next administration. Some of these changes, however, probably should have been made a long time ago and will likely remain in place for years to come.
Perhaps the biggest and most controversial parts of the plan involve changes to enforcement policies toward undocumented immigrants. The executive action provides three key changes in that sphere:
 • The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program is being expanded. The program will defer the removal of and allow employment authorization (for three years) for persons who entered the United States prior to their 16th birthday. The cutoff date for arrival in the United States has been moved from 2007 to Jan. 1, 2010, and the upper age limit (31) for applicants has been removed. The changes are supposed to take effect within 90 days.
 • A new Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) program will also grant deferral of removal and employment authorization to parents of U.S. citizen or lawful permanent resident children born on or before Nov. 20, 2014. The parent must prove continuous residence in the U.S. since Jan. 1, 2010, to qualify, and cannot qualify if he or she is considered to be in a specific “enforcement priority group.” This aspect should take effect in 180 days.
 • The Department of Homeland Security has been instructed to adjust its enforcement priorities away from interior enforcement against persons with no criminal record or minor criminal records and to devote more resources to border enforcement and interior enforcement against violent criminals, gang activity, terrorists or other national security threats. The administration is calling this a “felons not families” policy.
The effects of these changes on New Hampshire will likely be modest, given its relatively low foreign-born population. Still, for people who have been living in the shadows for many years, the opportunity to have employment authorization and a driver’s license can mean increased job mobility, better utilization of their skills, higher wages, and increased consumer spending.
New Hampshire recently made driving without a license a class B Misdemeanor (effective Jan. 1, 2015) so this is timely for many persons who previously were not legally able to obtain a driver’s license.

Business-related reforms

Another set of reforms are aimed directly at improving business immigration.
Only Congress can increase the number of employment visas available in a given year. However, a few adjustments have been made through executive action to make it easier to attract and retain well educated and high skilled workers:
 • In the past, dependents of H-1B skilled workers (H-4 visas) have not been authorized to work. That will be changed in January 2015. That should have a positive economic impact right away.
 • The waiting times for employment-based green cards are very long (often many years), so people sometimes run into problems while waiting. They may run out of time on their temporary visas, others may get a promotion or have to take a new job (if a company closes or changes hands), and this has sometimes been grounds for denying their green card application. Potential fixes for these issues are being considered by the Department of Homeland Security, although no timeline has been announced for implementation.
 • Other areas of improvement in the business immigration arena include broadening and extending the Optional Practical Training (OPT) programs for students, especially in a STEM program; making user-friendly improvements to the
Program Electronic Review Management (PERM) labor certification program, which underlies the employment-based permanent resident process; and liberalizing the immigration rules for highly capitalized immigrant investors and for persons with exceptional abilities and advanced degrees.
Additional initiatives in various areas that needed attention were also included, such as: creating an interagency workgroup on worksite immigration enforcement; reorganizing the joint agency operations on the southern border and reviewing the personnel composition and compensation at Immigration and Customs Enforcement; making naturalization (U.S. citizenship) more affordable; and easing the path for immigrant families of military enlistees.
All of these announced measures are temporary in nature and can only soften the edges of our broken immigration system rather than repair it. There are still many additional reforms needed to make the immigration system work efficiently, humanely and to the highest benefit of the United States. Comprehensive reform will have to wait for a legislative fix from Congress.
Randall A. Drew, principal of Drew Office, Bedford, has been practicing immigration law in New Hampshire since 1998. He can be reached at 603-644-3739 or randall@drewpllc.com.
Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Monday, November 17, 2014

In-Country Refugee/Parole Program for Minors in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras With Parents Lawfully Present in the United States

In-Country Refugee/Parole Program for Minors in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras With Parents Lawfully Present in the United States



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE and U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY
The United States is establishing an in-country refugee/parole program in El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras to provide a safe, legal, and orderly alternative to the dangerous journey that some children are currently undertaking to the United States. This program will allow certain parents who are lawfully present in the United States to request access to the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program for their children still in one of these three countries. Children who are found ineligible for refugee admission but still at risk of harm may be considered for parole on a case-by-case basis. The refugee/parole program will not be a pathway for undocumented parents to bring their children to the United States, but instead, the program will provide certain vulnerable, at-risk children an opportunity to be reunited with parents lawfully resident in the United States.
Applications for this program are initiated in the United States. Beginning in December 2014, a parent lawfully present in the United States will be able to file Department of State form DS-7699 requesting a refugee resettlement interview for unmarried children under 21 in El Salvador, Guatemala, or Honduras. Under certain circumstances, if the second parent resides with the child in the home country and is currently married to the lawfully present parent in the United States, the second parent may be added to the child’s petition and considered for refugee status, and if denied refugee status, for parole. Form DS-7699 must be filed with the assistance of a designated resettlement agency that works with the U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration to help resettle refugees in the United States. The form will not be available on the Department of State website to the general public and cannot be completed without the assistance of a Department of State-funded resettlement agency. These resettlement agencies are located in more than 180 communities throughout the United States. When the program is launched, the Department of State will provide information on how to contact one of these agencies to initiate an application.
Once a form DS-7699 has been filed, the child in his/her home country will be assisted through the program by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), which manages the U.S. Resettlement Support Center (RSC) in Latin America. IOM personnel from the RSC will contact each child directly and in the order in which the forms filed by lawfully present parents have been received by the U.S. Department of State. IOM will invite the children to attend pre-screening interviews in their country of origin in order to prepare them for a refugee interview with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DNA relationship testing will be required to confirm the biological relationship between the parent in the United States and the in-country child. After the IOM pre-screening interview but before the DHS interview, the lawfully present parent in the United States will be notified by IOM via the resettlement agency about how to submit DNA evidence of the relationship with their claimed child(ren) in El Salvador, Guatemala, or Honduras. If DNA relationship testing confirms the claimed relationship(s), IOM will schedule the DHS refugee interview.
DHS will conduct interviews with each child to determine whether he or she is eligible for refugee status and admissible to the United States. All applicants must complete all required security checks and obtain a medical clearance before they are approved to travel as a refugee to the United States. IOM will arrange travel for the refugee(s) to the United States. The parent of the child will sign a promissory note agreeing to repay the cost of travel to the United States. Approved refugees will be eligible for the same support provided to all refugees resettled in the United States, including assignment to a resettlement agency that will assist with reception and placement, and assistance registering children in school.
Applicants found by DHS to be ineligible for refugee status in the United States will be considered on a case-by-case basis for parole, which is a mechanism to allow someone who is otherwise inadmissible to come to the United States for urgent humanitarian reasons or significant public benefit. In order for the applicant(s) to be considered for parole, the parent in the United States will need to submit a Form I-134, Affidavit of Support, with supporting documentation to DHS. An individual considered for parole may be eligible for parole if DHS finds that the individual is at risk of harm, he/she clears all background vetting, there is no serious derogatory information, and someone has committed to financially support the individual while he/she is in the United States. Those children and any eligible parent considered for parole will be responsible for obtaining and paying for a medical clearance. An individual authorized parole will not be eligible for a travel loan but must book and pay for the flight to the United States. Parole is temporary and does not confer any permanent legal immigration status or path to permanent legal immigration status in the United States. Parolees are not eligible for medical and other benefits upon arrival in the United States, but are eligible to attend school and/or apply for employment authorization. Individuals authorized parole under this program generally will be authorized parole for an initial period of two years and may request renewal.
It is anticipated that a relatively small number of children from Central America will be admitted to the United States as refugees in FY 2015, given the anticipated December launch and the length of time it takes to be processed for U.S. refugee admission. Any child or parent admitted as a refugee will be included in the Latin America/Caribbean regional allocation of the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program, which is 4,000 for FY 2015. If needed, there is some flexibility within the U.S. Refugee Admissions Program to accommodate a higher than anticipated number from Latin America in FY 2015.








 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Saturday, November 15, 2014

5 Things You Can Do Now To Prepare for The President's Announcement on Immigration | United We Dream

5 Things You Can Do Now To Prepare for The President's Announcement on Immigration | United We Dream





1. Don’t Get Scammed








2. Save Money





To see the other three click the link above.



Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Thursday, November 13, 2014

New MAVNI memo: DACA recipients are eligible. - Drew Law Office, pllc.

New MAVNI memo: DACA recipients are eligible. - Drew Law Office, pllc.



MAVNI stands for Military Accessions Vital to the National Interest. The program allows persons who have medical or language skills needed by the US Military to enlist even if they are not US citizens. People who have TPS, or Asylum/Refugee status can apply as well as persons in many types of valid non-immigrant status. Now persons who have been granted DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) can also qualify for the program. Keep in mind, Spanish is NOT one of the languages that is needed for the MAVNI program. Persons who serve in the US military can later become US citizens on a special accelerated schedule.





http://www.defense.gov/news/mavni-fact-sheet.pdf

or

http://www.drewpllc.com/immigration-attorney-news/newmavnimemodacarecipientsareeligible



Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Friday, October 17, 2014

TPS Extended for Nicaragua and Honduras - Drew Law Office, pllc.

TPS Extended for Nicaragua and Honduras - Drew Law Office, pllc.





Temporary Protected Status Extended for Honduras

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Honduras for an additional 18 months, effective Jan. 6, 2015, through July 5, 2016.




Temporary Protected Status Extended for Honduras

Secretary of Homeland Security Jeh Johnson has extended Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for eligible nationals of Honduras for an additional 18 months, effective Jan. 6, 2015, through July 5, 2016.






Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

43 Missing Students, a Mass Grave and a Suspect: Mexico’s Police - NYTimes.com

43 Missing Students, a Mass Grave and a Suspect: Mexico’s Police - NYTimes.com

For those out there who think the Central American children who have been coming to the US Border seeking protection from gangs --were making it up -- how about a story from a little closer. Click the link above to see the complete story from Randy Archibold of the NYT.

----

Missing students Guerrero Mexico
[There have been] ... 43 students reported missing after deadly clashes with the police on Sept. 26, when at least six student protesters and bystanders were killed in the restive, rural state of Guerrero, one of the poorest in the country and long afflicted by political, social and criminal upheaval.



The state prosecutor investigating why the police opened fire on students from their vehicles has found mass graves in Iguala — the small industrial city where the confrontations occurred — containing 28 badly burned and dismembered bodies.



The prosecutors had already arrested 22 police officers after the clashes, saying the officers secretly worked for, or were members of, a local gang. Now they are investigating whether the police apprehended the students after the confrontation and deliberately turned them over to the local gang. Two witnesses in custody told prosecutors that the gang then killed the protesters on the orders of a leader known as El Chucky.



“I saw police trucks go up and down the hill to up there, where the bodies are found,” said one man in the neighborhood near the site who declined to give his name out of fear. “Then came the news they found the grave and it may be the students. But you would be a fool around here to accuse the police and expect to live.”



Even in a country accustomed to mass killings, the case has generated alarm, both for the possible involvement of the police and for the fact that the students were not known to have criminal ties. Miguel Martínez, a representative for the families, said students at the school had fought back against extortion attempts by gangs last year, but it was not clear if that could have made them a target now.



-------------

 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Obama Approves Plan to Let Children in Central America Apply for Refugee Status - NYTimes.com

Obama Approves Plan to Let Children in Central America Apply for Refugee Status - NYTimes.com



WASHINGTON — President Obama has approved a plan to allow several thousand young children from Central American countries to apply for refugee status in the United States, providing a legal path for some of them to join family members already living in America, White House officials said Tuesday.


The program is aimed at helping to discourage many children from making a long, dangerous trek across Mexico in an attempt to cross into the United States and join their parents. The idea was first presented to Mr. Obama at the height of the summer’s border crisis, when tens of thousands of young children from El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras were pouring across the border from Mexico and presenting themselves to American border patrol agents as refugees fleeing from rape and gang violence.


-------------------------------


click the link above to see the rest of a really informative piece.
Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Wednesday, July 16, 2014

Refugee children at the border. - Drew Law Office, pllc.

Refugee children at the border. - Drew Law Office, pllc.

If you have been watching the news at all over the past couple of weeks you will have heard about the dramatic increase in the numbers of children and families fleeing the violence and poverty of Central American countries such as Honduras, El Salvador, and Guatemala. Some press reports estimate that 50-60 thousand children have turned themselves in to authorities at the southern US border seeking a way to stay here.



click on the link to read my thoughts on the issue...

 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Latino Jobs Growth Driven by U.S. Born | Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project

Latino Jobs Growth Driven by U.S. Born | Pew Research Center's Hispanic Trends Project

Immigrants No Longer the Majority of Hispanic Workers
For the first time in nearly two decades, immigrants do not account for the majority of Hispanic workers in the United States. Meanwhile, most of the job gains made by Hispanics during the economic recovery from the Great Recession of 2007-09 have gone to U.S.-born workers, according to a new Pew Research Center analysis of government data.
Immigrants No Longer the Majority of Latino WorkersIn 2013, 49.7% of the more than 22 million employed Latinos were immigrants. This share was down sharply from the pre-recession peak of 56.1% in 2007. Although Latinos have gained 2.8 million jobs since the recession ended in 2009, only 453,000 of those went to immigrants. Moreover, all of the increase in employment for Latino immigrants happened in the first two years of the recovery, from 2009 to 2011. Since then, from 2011 to 2013, the employment of Latino immigrants is unchanged.



Click the link above to see the full article and link to the full report.
Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Thursday, June 12, 2014

World Cup Opinions in 19 Countries: Likes, Dislikes, Predictions - NYTimes.com

World Cup Opinions in 19 Countries: Likes, Dislikes, Predictions - NYTimes.com

It may not have much to do with immigration law or New Hampshire -- but today is the first day of the World Cup Finals -- so I thought I would repost this chart from the New York Times. Many of my clients are big soccer/futbol fans, and getting my clients want they want is always my goooooooooooooaaaalllllll ;-)








Continue reading the main story
Who Will Win the
World Cup?
ACCORDING TO...TOP ANSWER2ND ANSWER
Argentina
Argentina
Brazil
Australia
Brazil
Australia
Brazil
Brazil
Germany
Chile
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Brazil
Colombia
Costa Rica
Brazil
Germany
England
Brazil
Spain
France
Brazil
France
Germany
Brazil
Germany
Greece
Brazil
Spain
Italy
Brazil
Italy
Japan
Brazil
Japan
Mexico
Brazil
Germany
Netherlands
Brazil
Netherlands
Portugal
Brazil
Portugal
Russia
Brazil
Russia
South Korea
Brazil
Spain
Spain
Spain
Brazil
USA
USA
Brazil

Which Team Are You
Rooting Against?
ACCORDING TO...TOP ANSWER2ND ANSWER
Argentina
England
Brazil
Australia
USA
Iran
Brazil
Argentina
Brazil
Chile
Argentina
USA
Colombia
Argentina
USA
Costa Rica
Mexico
Argentina
England
Russia
Germany
France
Algeria
France
Germany
Iran
Honduras
Greece
Germany
USA
Italy
USA
Iran
Japan
South Korea
Japan
Mexico
USA
Iran
Netherlands
Iran
Germany
Portugal
France
Germany
Russia
USA
Russia
South Korea
Japan
South Korea
Spain
Iran
Germany
USA
USA
Russia

Who Plays the Most
Beautiful Soccer?(excluding your own team)
ACCORDING TO...TOP ANSWER2ND ANSWER
Argentina
Brazil
Spain
Australia
Brazil
England
Brazil
Spain
Germany
Chile
Brazil
Spain
Colombia
Brazil
Spain
Costa Rica
Spain
Brazil
England
Brazil
Spain
France
Brazil
Spain
Germany
Brazil
Spain
Greece
Brazil
Spain
Italy
Brazil
Spain
Japan
Spain
England
Mexico
Brazil
Spain
Netherlands
Brazil
Spain
Portugal
Brazil
Spain
Russia
Brazil
Spain
South Korea
Brazil
Spain
Spain
Brazil
Germany
USA
Brazil
Spain
Note: The answers shown exclude the generic answers "Don't know" and "I don't have a least favorite team".


 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Renewal time is here! - Drew Law Office, pllc.

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Renewal time is here! - Drew Law Office, pllc.



The first DACA approvals will begin to expire in September 2014. To avoid a lapse in the period of deferral and employment authorization, individuals must file renewal requests before the expiration of their current period of DACA. USCIS encourages requestors to submit their renewal request approximately 120 days (four months) before their current period of deferred action expires.



 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Monday, June 2, 2014

We Are One (WAO) Festival in Manchester (08/16/2014) - Drew Law Office, pllc.

We Are One (WAO) Festival in Manchester (08/16/2014) - Drew Law Office, pllc. 


The biggest multicultural festival in New Hampshire. Manchester August 16, 2014.



Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Tuesday, May 20, 2014

Attorney Drew writes about immigration consequences of NH legislation. - Drew Law Office, pllc.

Attorney Drew writes about immigration consequences of NH legislation. - Drew Law Office, pllc.

Here is a link to the opinion piece in the NH Bar News or you can continue reading below.


Amongst the many legislative measure considered every session by the New Hampshire General Court, there are always a couple that catch my eye as being of particular significance to my immigration law clients. This year is no exception. There are two bills likely to be laws by the time you read this that will affect the lives of my clients here in New Hampshire. The first of these, SB 394, modifies our marriage laws and is part policy and part technical corrections bill. 

Most everyone now knows that New Hampshire recognizes same-sex marriages – but did you know a same-sex marriage solemnized in the state becomes null and void if the parties actually reside in a state that doesn’t recognize same-sex couples? Senate Bill 394 ends this practice of self-defeating our own marriage laws. Upon enactment, such marriages will remain legal in New Hampshire (and federally), while other states can maintain their right not to recognize the validity of the bond. This bill is not directed towards immigrants, but this issue comes up quite often in the immigration context, as legal residence is often a direct result of a marital relationship. We have had clients in the recent past who wished to be married in New Hampshire but who had to be directed to our neighboring New England states to avoid the very problems SB 394 is designed to solve. 

The second bill is also, at least ostensibly, not directed at the immigrant population. House Bill 1135 will, however, have an impact that falls hardest on the undocumented immigrant community and those in the process of legalizing their immigration status. This bill changes the current law regarding operating a motor vehicle without a valid New Hampshire driver’s license. As it stands today, driving without a valid license is a violation of law for which a person must appear in court and, if convicted, pay a fine. Only if a person is convicted twice within a calendar year will he or she be found guilty of a misdemeanor and face possible jail time. 

Under HB 1135, that changes, for some. I have heard the law is a response to the tragic deaths of two cyclists in Hampton (and serious injury to others) last year caused by an unlicensed driver. While I support the Legislature’s desire to try to prevent such occurrences, I think this bill missed the mark. I don’t know whether HB 1135 would have changed what happened in the Hampton case, but it will certainly negatively affect my clients. For example, a New Hampshire resident who, due to inattention, lack of motivation, or some other reason, fails to renew his or her license for up to a year and is caught driving will still only be guilty of a violation, unless it happens twice in 12 months. 

However, a person who never had a New Hampshire license or has one that expired could be arrested and found guilty of a misdemeanor and jailed. Immigrants who are undocumented cannot be issued a driver’s license in New Hampshire; those immigrants who are in the process of obtaining legal status or fighting to keep their status often can go long periods of time without the necessary documentation to obtain a New Hampshire driver’s license. Those are the people who are going to be penalized by the new law – not persons who have had a license suspended or revoked and, for the most part, not unlicensed US citizens, either. 

Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Lawyers Metro Manchester NH (603) 644-3739 or www.immigrationNH.com

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Public Schools and Undocumented Children - USDOJ/USDOE - Drew Law Office, pllc.

Public Schools and Undocumented Children - USDOJ/USDOE - Drew Law Office, pllc.



Is near the end of the school year a strange time to be reminding schools that all children present in the USA are entitled to an education? Yes, but better late than never I suppose. See the links on our home page section "recent announcements" for more information.



 Drew Law Office, PLLC -- Immigration Attorneys, Manchester Metro, NH (603) 644-3739 or www.drewpllc.com

Monday, April 28, 2014

Removals vs returns: how to think about Obama's deportation record - Vox

Removals vs returns: how to think about Obama's deportation record - Vox



Currently, the federal government uses two different terms for when it apprehends an unauthorized immigrant and expels him or her from the country. There are "removals," which involve a formal court order. And then there are "returns," which do not. In my article, I used "deportations" to refer to removals only — for reasons explained below.
This distinction matters a fair bit. The Obama administration is on pace for more removals than any president in history. But there have been far fewer returns under Obama than under George W. Bush (chart via The Federalist,* which counts both "removals" and "returns" as "deportations"):
Deportations
click the link to see much more on this topic.



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